Air Date: Friday, November 03, 2006
Time Slot: 9:00 PM-11:00 PM EST on ABC
Episode Title: "N/A"
[NOTE: The following article is a press release issued by the aforementioned network and/or company. Any errors, typos, etc. are attributed to the original author. The release is reproduced solely for the dissemination of the enclosed information.]


From the extremely wealthy to celebrities, from star athletes to the beautiful, �20/20� takes a special look at privilege: Who has it, how do they use it and how does it affect you? �Privilege in America: Who�s Shutting You Out?� airs on �20/20,� FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3 (9:00-11:00 p.m., ET), on the ABC Television Network. Using experts in various fields and interviews with the rich and famous -- as well as hidden cameras and celebrity look-alikes -- �20/20� correspondents report on 10 different areas of privilege, including:

� Education and Privilege � Are educations at elite colleges for sale? As Martin Bashir reports, for high school students applying to top colleges this fall, it may be worth preparing for the harsh truth about university admissions. Dr. Keith Brodie, a former President of Duke University comes clean about who is accepted � and why. �I believe that it is the case that there are a few slots in every entering class that are basically for sale.�

� Nepotism and Privilege � Ivanka Trump�s first job at her father Donald�s empire is as a Vice President. At 24, has she earned such a hefty title at such a young age, or is it classic nepotism at work? �It�s the American Dream, handing down what you had to your children. Grooming them to follow you,� Trump tells Lynn Sherr. �Nepotism is regarded in a negative sense when it�s associated with the children of the very wealthy. But it�s not when it�s a family-run smaller business.� Sherr reports on keeping it �all in the family.�

� Celebrity and Privilege � To be famous in America is to have an all-access pass to the best that life has to offer. For a first-hand look at that kind of life, �20/20� hired celebrity look-alikes to see how they would be treated in everyday situations. JuJu Chang reports on the perks and privileges of celebrity.

� Law and Privilege � Do the scales of justice tip toward the wealthy and well-connected? �20/20� looks at two cases in Texas: One of a wealthy man who committed murder and never served a day in jail, and another of a man from the other side of the tracks who has spent 16 years behind bars for violating his probation by smoking marijuana. Jim Avila confronts the judge who presided over both cases.

� Beauty and Privilege � All of us like to look at beautiful people, but does beauty really bring you privilege or, as some people say, is beauty a curse? John Stossel reports on whether beautiful people have it easier in life, as well as the extremes some people go to enhance their looks.

� Sports and Privilege � If you can throw a great pass on the football field, do you get a free pass in the court of law? Don Dahler reports on whether or not star athletes � at any level � should be granted special privileges.

� Perks of Privilege � Being privileged means never having to do your own chores � and also being able to throw outrageous parties. Chris Connelly reports.

� Race and Privilege � Slavery ended hundreds of years ago, and we have the Civil Rights laws. So is there still such a thing as white privilege? What will �20/20�s� hidden cameras show? John Stossel reports.

� Children of Privilege � Growing up in a wealthy and/or an influential family definitely has its perks, but as Deborah Roberts reports, a life of privilege can also have its perils -- just ask Christopher Kennedy Lawford.

� The Anti-Privilege � Gretchen Wilson, a 33-year-old Country Music siren whose anthem, �Redneck Woman,� catapulted her to the top of the charts is the epitome of anti-privilege. This millionaire chart-topper does her own laundry, shops herself at Wal-Mart and spends hours signing free autographs at Country Music events. Chris Connelly reports on an unusual celebrity life.

�20/20� is anchored by Elizabeth Vargas and John Stossel. David Sloan is executive producer.

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