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PRIMETIME [EPISODE CHANGE]
Air Date: Wednesday, September 09, 2009
Time Slot: 10:00 PM-11:00 PM EST on ABC
Episode Title: (#C308) "CRIME"
[NOTE: The following article is a press release issued by the aforementioned network and/or company. Any errors, typos, etc. are attributed to the original author. The release is reproduced solely for the dissemination of the enclosed information.]

IS MISSOURI'S RADICALLY DIFFERENT APPROACH TO THE JUVENILE JAIL SYSTEM WORKING?, ON "PRIMETIME: CRIME," WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 ON ABC

There are nearly 100,000 kids in America's juvenile justice system, most in orange jumpsuits, locked behind bars and under constant guard. But the state of Missouri has cast aside the familiar model of juvenile jails in favor of a radically different approach � therapy and rehabilitation. At the Waverly Regional Youth Center in Waverly, MO, the walls are brightly colored and cell-blocks have been replaced with dorm-rooms. At the Rosa Parks Center in Fulton, MO, kids live in small teams, where they help and support one another. Inmates must get to the root of the problem that started them down their path of crime. Chris Cuomo reports how this unique system is providing an effective and less expensive alternative to America's troubled juvenile justice system, on "Primetime: Crime," WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 (10:02-11:00 p.m., ET) on the ABC Television Network.

For the past year "Primetime" has had unprecedented access, living alongside some of Missouri's toughest juvenile inmates. Cuomo reports on how society's so-called "bad kids" and juvenile predators may actually be some of its most damaged. Rachel, 15, stole nearly a quarter of a million dollars and Tye, 17, began selling prescription pills and using meth at age 10 -- and was first locked up at 11 years of age. The hour also documents how a 16-year-old transitions from inside the system to being back at home. Will he be able to avoid the temptation of the streets? "Primetime" is there when some of the kids make stunning allegations of abuse as they try to come to terms with their crimes and what may have led to them.

David Sloan is the executive producer of "Primetime: Crime."

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